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Fact or Fiction? The Myths of Sleeping Debunked

  Sleeping Myths sleep tips snoring Sleep Health
Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Getting a Good Night’s Sleep Starts with Knowing the Difference

Chances are you’ve had trouble sleeping at some point in your life. In fact, for some of us, poor sleep is just … normal. But what if what you believed to be “normal” about lack of sleep was actually abnormal? Breaking down the walls between fact and fiction might just be the ticket you need to get a better night’s sleep. So, what are these sleeping myths?

Myth #1 - Snoring on a nightly basis is normal and nothing to worry about.

Myth #2 - Your physical health does not affect how well you sleep.

Myth #3 - Daytime fatigue just means you need more than 8 hours of sleep at night.

Myth #4 - You can train your body to function on less sleep.

 

#1: The Schnoz Dilemma

Snoring loudly every night can very well be not normal at all. In fact, in general, it’s a sign that you’re not receiving the correct airflow through your nose and throat, which disturbs your sleep and causes daytime fatigue. A quick fix? Try switching your sleeping position from your back to your side, skip the after-dinner alcohol, and keep the pillows clean. If these remedies aren’t working, it may be a sign that you suffer from Obstructive Sleep Apnea, which can be very harmful to your heart and potentially life threatening. Consult your doctor if someone has noted you stop breathing for short periods of time while sleeping.

 

#2: Weighing In

The amount of restful sleep you are receiving can be traced back to the condition of your physical health. Poor health—such as obesity, hypertension, and diabetes—coupled with lack of exercise, factor into a poor night’s sleep. Recent studies show that lack of sleep negatively affects weight, and those who slept less tended to weigh more. Start with a walk around the block before you head in for the night and see if that helps.

 

#3 Counting Sleep

Unfortunately, there is no such thing as “catching up” on sleep. So, when you find yourself fatigued during the day, tacking on an extra 1-2 hours of shuteye that night isn’t going to do you any good. Sleep works with quality over quantity, and 10 hours of fitful sleep will do less good than 6 hours of restful sleep. The National Sleep Foundation recommends adults get about 8 hours of quality sleep per night, so it’s best to set up a sleep routine and stick to it. A solid routine will help ensure you’re getting those quality hours that count.

 

#4 To Cheat … Or Not to Cheat

Is it possible to train yourself to get by on less sleep? Not really. If we are consistently getting little sleep each night, our sleep “debt,” as it’s referred to, cannot be adequately repaid. The more sleep that is lost, the less chance to get it back, and the more likely we are prone to obesity, diabetes, and depression. You can make yourself get up earlier, but your body’s natural reaction to lack of sleep will show during the day, specifically through extreme fatigue and lack of mental and physical functioning.

 

Quality Time

Sometimes your lack of sleep may be due to an outdated mattress or pillow. At Jonathan Stevens, we know the importance of not only getting the correct quantity of sleep, but also the correct quality of sleep. If you are ready to change how you sleep at night, get a head start by taking the Mattress Finder Quiz, and then stop by any of our 8 convenient locations to talk with one of our experts.

 


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